MySelf as MyShelf

On never being caught in the dust on the shelf.


Ask me anything  

Chapter [something]

And so I return to Colorado. After my mostly very ridiculous adventures, real life suddenly beckons me back home like a slap in the face.

I return to my friends and family, to my jobs, skiing and biking, and to nursing school. I’m genuinely excited (wish there were more words in the English language to describe feelings) to come home with new friends and stories, and new goals in mind, but I’m also completely terrified. Four months doesn’t seem all that long when it’s spent out of a suitcase, but returning home shows that some things change a little, some things don’t change at all, some things are incredibly more noticeable, and some things change a lot.

I suppose I might have changed a little too.

I’ve decided to accept these inevitable changes as a fresh start and a new chapter in my life. And also because of this, I’ve decided that this will be my last post to this little blog. I’m ready for that change and as scary as it is, I’m going to accept it with open arms.

I’m looking back and it’s been a good, interesting, and very, very crazy year. I’ve had a lot of fun, a lot of mistakes, and a ton of so called “learning experiences.” I’m happy to say that I will always continue to never “settle,” to always keep going, and doing and learning. Never being caught in the dust, and onto a new beginning in my life!

:)

Oh dear mountain bike, how I have missed you…….

P. Sherman 42 Wallaby Way Sydney!

Dear Australia, Thank you for Teaching me:

  • That 4 months is not near long enough to gallavant through this huge country
  • Not to pack so much stuff I don’t really need
  • Pack more sunscreen and bug spray!
  • How to brew my own beer
  • How to find south in the night sky
  • That here I’m a “Yank!”
  • How to speak proper Australian language like “g’day,” “wheeley bin,” ”heyowya goin,” “wadda rekken,” and “ta!”
  • bad words in French, Dutch, German, Swedish…
  • How to sleep on hardwood floors, on airport benches, and in a camper with 4 other messy girls
  • That my legs will never be the same…after being scratched and bruised by coffee trees, scarred by attacking plants in the jungle and lakes, and eaten up by sand flies, mosquitoes and bed bugs..
  • That I HATE sand flies.
  • That everything I had planned didn’t happen, but better things took their places!
  • That really good friends can be made anywhere and in the strangest of circumstances
  • That I can’t believe I only have 6 days left, I’m so happy and sad to be coming home, and this was the best decision I’ve ever made!
I decide to be happy because it’s better for the health! John’s Mum

Day-Off-Work-Sunshine Day!

More shenanigans…Low Isles and snorkeling the Great Barrier Reef

Mom, click on the pictures!

Hope you have a great day! Thinking of you xxoo

Love, love, love our little dysfunctional family…Kimberly, Jenny, Sam, Pauline, John, Simone, and Me <3

Laundry Day!
An elaboration on the previous post about the coffee plantation is completely necessary right about now&#8230;I spent two months in Babinda, and loved every single minute of it. I loved living in a small town, where I met and knew mostly everyone. I learned some Australian sugar cane culture, and had way too much fun doing way too many ridiculous things. I made some amazing friends&#8230;who always have a home when they come visit me in America :)
After two months of working in a pub at a hotel in this tiny, rainy town, I moved up to Mareeba to work at Jaques Coffee Plantation. I had the chance to work in the cafe on the property, but opted out to work in the field instead. I decided that I have my enitre life to learn how to make a decent coffee (which I learned I&#8217;m not very good at&#8230;), but I really only have this one chance to be out in a coffee field every day learning how to pick, plant, and grow coffee! I&#8217;m absolutely loving it&#8230;I&#8217;ve also decided that I&#8217;m going to have a garden when I go home because I really, really enjoy working out in the sun and dirt :) I&#8217;ve always done jobs that involved people&#8230;either serving or caring for them, but farming is all about me and the ground and the plants. I don&#8217;t have to have a smile on my face the whole time in order to do a good job; I can be completely grumpy, take it out in the work, and still have a wonderful day!! &#8230;I might just be a farmer of somesort someday, but I can start with a simple garden :)
I&#8217;ve only been here a little over a week, but it&#8217;s become one of my most favorite experiences I&#8217;ve had in Australia so far. I live in my own little camper and do my laundry in the outdoor tub. During the day after work, there&#8217;s a creek to swim and a rope swing to play on. The stars at night are the clearest I&#8217;ve ever seen in my life, and there are wild kangaroos that hop through the fields in the morning.
The very, very best part about being out here in the middle of this Australian coffee farm is living in the bush with six other backpackers. We&#8217;ve become a sort of family, coming from all different places and life experiences, but all have this crazy place in common! We light a fire and have family dinners every night. We take turns doing the dishes, going into town to pick up supplies, and we have movie nights where we hang up a sheet outside and watch the film on a projector.. It&#8217;s really such simple living, and as I keep saying over and over, I&#8217;m just so happy! You don&#8217;t really need much other than a little area to make a small place to sleep for a home, an outdoor kitchen table, and a hose to fill up the tub&#8230;

Laundry Day!

An elaboration on the previous post about the coffee plantation is completely necessary right about now…I spent two months in Babinda, and loved every single minute of it. I loved living in a small town, where I met and knew mostly everyone. I learned some Australian sugar cane culture, and had way too much fun doing way too many ridiculous things. I made some amazing friends…who always have a home when they come visit me in America :)

After two months of working in a pub at a hotel in this tiny, rainy town, I moved up to Mareeba to work at Jaques Coffee Plantation. I had the chance to work in the cafe on the property, but opted out to work in the field instead. I decided that I have my enitre life to learn how to make a decent coffee (which I learned I’m not very good at…), but I really only have this one chance to be out in a coffee field every day learning how to pick, plant, and grow coffee! I’m absolutely loving it…I’ve also decided that I’m going to have a garden when I go home because I really, really enjoy working out in the sun and dirt :) I’ve always done jobs that involved people…either serving or caring for them, but farming is all about me and the ground and the plants. I don’t have to have a smile on my face the whole time in order to do a good job; I can be completely grumpy, take it out in the work, and still have a wonderful day!! …I might just be a farmer of somesort someday, but I can start with a simple garden :)

I’ve only been here a little over a week, but it’s become one of my most favorite experiences I’ve had in Australia so far. I live in my own little camper and do my laundry in the outdoor tub. During the day after work, there’s a creek to swim and a rope swing to play on. The stars at night are the clearest I’ve ever seen in my life, and there are wild kangaroos that hop through the fields in the morning.

The very, very best part about being out here in the middle of this Australian coffee farm is living in the bush with six other backpackers. We’ve become a sort of family, coming from all different places and life experiences, but all have this crazy place in common! We light a fire and have family dinners every night. We take turns doing the dishes, going into town to pick up supplies, and we have movie nights where we hang up a sheet outside and watch the film on a projector.. It’s really such simple living, and as I keep saying over and over, I’m just so happy! You don’t really need much other than a little area to make a small place to sleep for a home, an outdoor kitchen table, and a hose to fill up the tub…

To all my Nurs-ie Friends!

Sue told us once that we should never use the phrase, “I’m just the nurse…”

I have learned that in French, there is no direct translation for the English word, Nurse. Instead, the woman that works in our equivalent position is called sage femme, translating into English meaning wise woman.

They use this word because yes, the doctor is important, but the sage femme is the person who first and most cares. They are never “just nurses,” they are very wise women :)

Camping every day is doing me well :)
Pauline, a very beautiful Frenchwoman, might be one of the kindest people I&#8217;ve ever met&#8230; The other night, we all piled into the back of a truck, drove into the middle of the coffee field, and had a dance under the stars. Pauline, beer in hand, barefoot, and a huge smile on her face, comes rushing towards me and pulls me over to see a constellation. She tries to explain in English/French the name of the big dipper and then turns around backwards, and puts her head upside down saying&#8230;&#8221;Look!! We are home!!&#8221;
Good God, I love the world :)

Camping every day is doing me well :)

Pauline, a very beautiful Frenchwoman, might be one of the kindest people I’ve ever met… The other night, we all piled into the back of a truck, drove into the middle of the coffee field, and had a dance under the stars. Pauline, beer in hand, barefoot, and a huge smile on her face, comes rushing towards me and pulls me over to see a constellation. She tries to explain in English/French the name of the big dipper and then turns around backwards, and puts her head upside down saying…”Look!! We are home!!”

Good God, I love the world :)